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Immigration Status and Disparities in the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (Visit 2, 2014-2017) – Carolina Center for Population Aging and Health

Immigration Status and Disparities in the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (Visit 2, 2014-2017)

Citation

Guadamuz, Jenny S.; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon A.; Daviglus, Martha L.; Perreira, Krista M.; Calip, Gregory S.; Nutescu, Edith A.; Gallo, Linda C.; Castaneda, Sheila F.; Gonzalez, Franklyn, II; & Qato, Dima M. (2020). Immigration Status and Disparities in the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (Visit 2, 2014-2017). American Journal of Public Health, 110(9), 1397-1404. PMCID: PMC7427208

Abstract

Objectives: To estimate treatment rates of high cholesterol, hypertension, and diabetes among Hispanic/Latino immigrants by immigration status (i.e., naturalized citizens, documented immigrants, or undocumented immigrants).
Methods: We performed a cross-sectional analyses of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (visit 2, 2014-2017). We restricted our analysis to Hispanic/Latino immigrants with high cholesterol (n = 3974), hypertension (n = 3353), or diabetes (n = 2406); treatment was defined as use of statins, antihypertensives, and antidiabetics, respectively.
Results: When compared with naturalized citizens, undocumented and documented immigrants were less likely to receive treatment for high cholesterol (38.4% vs 14.1%; prevalence ratio [PR] = 0.37 [95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.27, 0.51] and 25.7%; PR = 0.67 [95% CI = 0.58, 0.76]), hypertension (77.7% vs 57.7%; PR = 0.74 [95% CI = 0.62, 0.89] and 68.1%; PR = 0.88 [95% CI = 0.82, 0.94]), and diabetes (60.3% vs. 50.4%; PR = 0.84 [95% CI = 0.68, 1.02] and 55.8%; PR = 0.93 [95% CI = 0.83, 1.03]); the latter did not reach statistical significance. Undocumented and documented immigrants had less access to health care, including insurance coverage or a usual health care provider, than naturalized citizens. Therefore, adjusting for health care access largely explained treatment disparities across immigration status.
Conclusions: Preventing cardiovascular disease among Hispanic/Latino immigrants should focus on undertreatment of high cholesterol, hypertension, and diabetes by increasing health care access, especially among undocumented immigrants.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2020.305745

Reference Type

Journal Article

Article Type

Regular

Year Published

2020

Journal Title

American Journal of Public Health

Author(s)

Guadamuz, Jenny S.
Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon A.
Daviglus, Martha L.
Perreira, Krista M.
Calip, Gregory S.
Nutescu, Edith A.
Gallo, Linda C.
Castaneda, Sheila F.
Gonzalez, Franklyn, II
Qato, Dima M.

PMCID

PMC7427208

Data Set/Study

Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)

Continent/Country

United States of America

Race/Ethnicity

Hispanic/Latinx